Linda Shenton Matchett on WWII historical fiction

Linda Shenton Matchett is an author, speaker, and history geek. A native of Baltimore, Maryland, she was born a stone’s throw from Fort McHenry and has lived in historic places all her life. Linda is a member of ACFW, RWA, and Sisters in Crime. She is a volunteer docent and archivist for the Wright Museum of WWII.

 

Tell us about your newest book.

Love’s Beliefis a modern retelling of the Old Testament story of Shiprah and Puah, two midwives who disobeyed Pharaoh’s laws in order to save Jewish babies. The story features Pia and Sabine Hertz, German midwives who go against Hitler’s Nuremburg Laws to save Jews and other “undesirables” during WWII.

What inspired you to write Love’s Belief?

As a former Human Resources professional I am fascinated by the history of women in the workforce. I love to read about ordinary women who end up being trailblazers in their profession (intentionally or unintentionally). I wanted to continue my Wartime Brides series, which thus far has included retellings of Ruth and Rahab. However, I wanted to go with a lesser-known Bible character and set the book in Germany. As soon as I read about Shiprah and Puah in Exodus, I knew I had my story.

What genre do you focus on and why?

I write historic fiction (romance and mystery) set during WWII. That era intrigues me because of the vast number of ordinary people who did extraordinary things during such a difficult period of time.

Why do you write? What drives you?

Writing fills me up, and I’m happiest sitting at my keyboard immersed in a story-any aspect: outlining, researching, writing, or editing. It gnaws at me when life gets in the way and I’m unable to get to the computer. I’m “destination driven” which means completing the manuscript is of utmost importance to me. I’m procedural about my writing down to scheduling word counts and chapters, so I know exactly when the book should be finished.

Who is your main character, and how did you choose that name?

My main character is Pia Hertz, and I wanted to use a name beginning with P because of basing the story on Puah. I went to several sites that listed popular girl’s names during the 1940s.

What is your work schedule like when you’re writing a book?

My schedule doesn’t vary because I’m always working on some phase of a book, and I need to juggle that with my full-time day job. I’m at the computer by 6:00 AM and write until I have to leave for work at 7:45. After I come home I work for a couple of hours in the evening, creating memes, writing guest blog posts, book research, recording YouTube videos, and other non-manuscript related writing. I don’t have to be at my job until 1:00 on Wednesdays, so that’s my favorite day because I have so much time to focus on my writing. Saturdays I work on my blog posts, YouTube Scripts, and watching training videos or podcasts.

What is the hardest part of being an author? Why?

The hardest part for me is not having enough time to write and do all the associated aspects of my career such as marketing, etc. With working full-time, I only have about twenty-five hours per week to commit to my “writing life,” and that’s not nearly enough. I often feel I’m behind schedule.

What’s the best part of your author’s life? Why?

The community of writers I have become associated with during my writing journey is like nothing I’ve experienced. I love the actual writing of a book, but it is a solitary pursuit, and I’m an extrovert. I love the interaction within the community as we commiserate, encourage, exhort, and celebrate together. My husband is incredibly supportive of my writing career, but he doesn’t “get” my need to write and hang out with other writers who talk to and about their characters as if they’re real. (Wait, they’re not?? J)

What’s one thing your readers should know about you?

For book research, I took shooting lessons from a New Hampshire State Police Officer. I was actually pretty good by the end of the afternoon.

What is your favorite pastime?

Being outside, no matter what the season or weather. My husband and I kayak during the warm months and snowshoe during the winter. Both of those activities immerse us in the beauty of God’s creation.

Do you have other books? We’d love to know.

I have six other romance novellas, two full-length mysteries, and a Word-Find book (WWII, of course!) My books are available at several retailers, but the best place to find them all is my website: http://www.lindashentonmatchett.com/p/books.html

What are you working on now?

I am currently writing Book 4 of the Wartime Bride series, called Love’s Allegiance.It is a retelling of the biblical story of Rebekkah and Isaac and will explore service by Conscientious Objectors during WWII. It is due out in August 2019. I am also finishing up two mysteries that will be out next Spring and Summer with dates to be determined.

Website: http://www.LindaShentonMatchett.com

Link to book: https://amzn.to/2V6ShRg

Social media links:

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/lindasmatchett

Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/lindasmatchett

Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/lindasmatchett

Amazon Author Page: https://www.amazon.com/Linda-Shenton-Matchett/e/B01DNB54S0

Goodreads Author Page: https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/15140007.Linda_Shenton_Matchett

BookBub: https://www.bookbub.com/authors/linda-shenton-matchett

 

 

 

 

Susan Page Davis on mail-order brides

Susan Page Davis is the author of more than eighty novels and a winner of the Carol Award, two Will Rogers Medallions, and 2 Faith, Hope & Love Chapter Readers’ Choice Awards. A native of Maine, she now lives in western Kentucky.

 

 

Tell us about your newest book.

“The Bride’s Dilemma” is part of the new Mail-Order Mishaps collection, about four mail-order brides whose plans went awry. Eve arrives in Cheyenne to learn that the man she came to marry is in jail, accused of murder. Should she get on the next eastbound train, or has God brought her here to save Caleb’s life?

 

What inspired you to write “The Bride’s Dilemma”?

When I was asked to be part of this collection, I thought about what could go wrong for a young woman in the nineteenth century who thought she’d found the ideal husband—a man she’d never met. Probably more than one mail-order bride learned her husband had committed crimes. But in my story, Eve’s intended is accused and she has to decide whether or not she really has faith in him.

What genre do you focus on and why?

I write a lot of historical romances, and many of them include mysteries. I also write contemporary mysteries and romantic suspense. I love the variety, and I choose the genre and setting that seems best for each story.

Why do you write? What drives you?

I’ve always enjoyed creating stories, since I was a girl. As an adult, I worked as a nonfiction writer, but once I tried writing fiction, I knew it was my niche.

What is your work schedule like when you’re writing a book?

When I’m on a deadline for a publisher, I usually write 2,000 to 3,000 words per day during the week. I start in the morning by eight o’clock. In the afternoon, I usually do writing-related tasks such as revising, interviews, and other promotion. This afternoon I’ll be preparing for a speaking engagement.

What is the hardest part of being an author? Why?

To me the hardest part is promoting my work. I’m a writer, not a publicist. I’m so thankful for companies like Barbour Publishing, who produced this collection. They do a wonderful job of promoting and marketing their books, and they help authors participate in the process. For books I produce independently, the burden is completely on the author.

What’s the best part of your author’s life? Why?

It’s being my own boss and not having to deal with the hassles of working outside the home. I can keep my schedule flexible and work the hours that are best for me.

What’s one unusual fact about you?

I am a certified farrier. Although I haven’t shoed a horse in many years, the knowledge and experience comes in very handy for the westerns I write.

How have you changed or grown as a writer?

I can see a big difference in my work now from my early books. It’s a compilation of many small things I’ve learned over the years. I try to make each book the best it can be.

What is your favorite pastime?

I’ve always enjoyed handcrafts. I like making things. I also enjoy family history, and of course, reading.

Do you have other books? We’d love to know.

Yes, I have more than eighty published titles. They can all be seen on my website: https://susanpagedavis.com. Some reader favorites are:

The Prairie Dreams Series (The Lady’s Maid, Lady Anne’s Quest, and A Lady in the Making)

The Maine Justice Series (The Priority Unit, Fort Point, and five other titles, the latest of which is Ransom of the Heart)

Frasier Island and its companion books, Finding Marie and Inside Story

The Ladies’ Shooting Club Series (The Sheriff’s Surrender, The Gunsmith’s Gallantry, and The Blacksmith’s Bravery)

And the Maine Brides Series (The Prisoner’s Wife, The Castaway’s Bride, and the Lumberjack’s Lady).

My newest books are the romantic suspense You Shouldn’t Have and historical novellas in the Captive Brides Collection and Seven Brides for Seven Texas Rangers Collection.

What are you working on now?

I created the concept for the Tearoom Mysteries Series for Guideposts Books a few years ago, and they’ve recently decided to expand the 25-book series by two more volumes. Elizabeth Ludwig is writing book 26, and I’m now working on book 27. I’m also working on something new, a private detective series.

Website: https://susanpagedavis.com

Link to book: Find Mail-Order Mishapsat https://amzn.to/2H67vlT

or at https://www.christianbook.com/order-mishaps-brides-adapt-marriage-plans/vickie-mcdonough/9781643520001/pd/3520001?event=ESRCG

Social media links: https://www.facebook.com/susanpagedavisauthor

Twitter: @SusanPageDavis

Newsletter: https://madmimi.com/signups/118177/join

 

 

 

 

 

C. Kevin Thompson on his Christian thriller

C. Kevin Thompson is married, going on 38 years now, to his wonderful, supportive wife Cindy. They have three daughters, all of which are married now. They have five grandchildren and a rescue dog named Tiny. He’s an ordained minister, assistant principal at a high school, loves college football, really likes Need to Breatheand plays percussion (drums, bongos, congas, etc.).

 

Tell us about your newest book.

When the Clock Strikes Fourteen (A Blake Meyer Thriller – Book 4)is Book 4 of 6 in this continuing series. At this stage of the story, Blake laments his past, how it is infiltrating his present, and how the future may irreparably harm his family. He has a lead on his family’s whereabouts, but they are still captives. Pawns in a deadly game of vengeance. And the plan to release the contagion that threatens to infect America with its own version of the Black Death is being modified by those responsible, making it harder to defend.

How would you describe this book to someone in a 30-second blurb?

I tell people, “Think of the TV show 24, put a Christian twist on it, and you have my Blake Meyer Thriller series.” When we say “Christian twist,” we’re talking about worldview and it being a clean read. But I feel it’s just as suspenseful and riveting as any show on TV, like 24or The Blacklist, etc. My readers agree.

Who is your main character, and how did you choose that name?

Blake Meyer is what I call a “tried and true hero for troubled times.” He’s served his country with distinction. He’s been a Black Ops guy, an Army Captain, an undercover agent, and now serves as a Supervisory Special Agent because it was to be a cover so he could keep tabs on a Russian assassin who becomes a popular figure in the story. Blake was a few months away from retiring. He and his wife Sara had agreed to do five more years, then he’d call it quits, or at least take on a desk job of sorts so there would no longer be any field work involved. He had a family to think about now. Little did Blake know his past had other plans.

I chose the name Blake Meyer from a series of questions I asked myself in the planning stages of writing this series. I took the one- or two-syllable idea and started playing around with names. I eventually chose one that didn’t seem to be overused but sounded realistic. A little macho, but also someone who knew how to think ahead four moves.

What is your work schedule like when you’re writing a book?

When I worked as a middle school AP, I would get up at four in the morning and write for two hours before getting ready for work. Now that I’m at a high school, I have to get almost that early for work! So, my writing diverts to after I get home. However, I find I’m not as fresh in the afternoon and evening as I am in the morning, so I spend more time on Saturdays writing now than I did before. It definitely keeps me out of the pool halls.

What’s one thing your readers should know about you?

I’ve been told by a publisher that I write “smart fiction.” I had to ask what she meant by that, and this was her response paraphrased: “You make people think when they read. You make people feel when they read. You make people stop and contemplate when they read.” I asked her if that was a good thing, and she said it was a very good thing. It’s always good to get comments like that from experienced publishers/editors.

What’s one unusual fact about you?

Only close friends and family know this, but I like to sing, and I’ve been told I’m good at it (and trust me, my family would not say I’m a good singer if they thought otherwise…we’re very truthful with one another when it comes to things like that). Being a singer/songwriter was something I always wanted to do. Now, I rock out in my truck on the way to and from work.

What is your favorite pastime?

Besides spending time with my wife and/or family, it’s watching college football. The year begins in late August and ends in January for me. Then there’s this long drought between January and August with just a hint of promise in April in and around spring games.

Do you have other books? We’d love to know.

I do. I have five published thus far. My debut novel, The Serpent’s Grasp, won the Blue Ridge Mountain Christian Writer’s Conference 2013 Selah Award for First Fiction (Debut Novel). Then, the first book in the Blake Meyer series, 30 Days Hath Revenge, was a Silver Medalist in the Reader’s Favorite-Christian Fiction category in 2013 as well. I also have Books 2 and 3 of my Blake Meyer series, Triple Timeand The Tide of Timesavailable. I also have a standalone novel contracted and scheduled for release in January 2020, titled The Letters.

What are you working on now?

I am currently working on Book 5 of the Blake Meyer series, A Pulse of Time. Then, it will be wrapping things up with Book 6 in the series, Devil of a Crime. Once those are completed, I have three different directions I can go.

Website:  https://ckevinthompson.com/

Link to book: https://ckevinthompson.com/when-the-clock-strikes-fourteen-a-blake-meyer-thriller-book-4

Social media links:

Kevin’s Writer’s Blog: www.ckevinthompson.blogspot.com/
Facebook: C. Kevin Thompson – Author Fan Page
Twitter: @CKevinThompson
Instagram: ckevinthompson
Pinterest: ckevinthompsonauthor
Goodreads: C. Kevin Thompson
BookBub: C. Kevin Thompson

Kevin is also a regular contributor to Seriously Write!

 

 

 

 

 

Karen Lynn Nolan on Appalachian fiction


Karen Lynn Nolan is an award-winning writer of Appalachian fiction, mystery/suspense, and memoir. Her years in the eastern Kentucky mountains instilled a love of storytelling, mystery, humor, stubbornness, and deep faith. Her debut novel is Above the Fog, set in the mountains of eastern Kentucky.

Tell us about your newest book.

Above the Fogtells the story of Coreen and her struggles with her abusive father and rejection by her mother. On the eve of Coreen’s thirteenth birthday, the outlook turns even darker and out of desperation she prays to a God she’s not sure exists. The answer to her prayer sets off an adventure no one expected—an adventure that forces them to choose between survival or devastation.

What inspired you to write Above the Fog?

When asked to write a scene during a local writing class, Coreen popped into my head. At the following class, the instructor asked for more detail and dialogue. Coreen and her family came to life for me and I had to tell their story. That one scene became a story I knew God wanted me to tell.

How would you describe this book to someone in a 30-second blurb?

Growing up in a coal mining camp is difficult enough. But when Coreen Shell’s abusive father makes a promise for her thirteenth birthday that could destroy what’s left of her life, she resorts a desperate prayer to a God she’s not sure exists. The next day, a flood washes through the coal camp, like a backhanded answer to her prayer. Coreen, her mother, and her crippled grandmother next door must climb the mountain to find refuge in a nearby church. Then, news of a murder changes everything, in a way Coreen never imagined. Will Coreen and her damaged, dysfunctional family conquer all the lies, secrets, hardship, and hatred … or be destroyed by them?

What genre do you focus on and why?

Appalachian fiction. I grew up in the mountains of eastern Kentucky and have come to realize no matter what I do or where I travel, I am an Appalachian mountain woman. These are my people.

Who is your main character, and how did you choose that name?

Coreen is my main character. I had recently reconnected with a high school friend, Corinne. When I reached into my brain to find a name, Corinne popped up. I changed the spelling only because non-Appalachians would need help in knowing how we pronounce it.

What is your work schedule like when you’re writing a book?

My first book didn’t have a schedule. I wrote when I had a chance. Some days I spent 8-10 hours writing. Other days I spent one hour. As I work on my second book, I must split my time with marketing. And life. I have chronic illnesses that sometimes interfere with my ability to sit at the computer and think. I attempt to write 3-4 hours a day on my good days.

What is the hardest part of being an author? Why?

Marketing. It takes me away from the creative side I enjoy and forces me to do left-brained activities that are more challenging.

What’s the best part of your author’s life? Why?

When I began the process, it was being in the zone so deeply that the story acted out in front of me and became a part of my life. After the release, I find great joy in reading reviews and comments about how the story touched readers’ hearts and gave them hope. It’s exciting knowing my hard work is not in vain.

What’s one thing your readers should know about you?

I’ve had an adventurous life. I have a degree in music and theater, spent six years in New York City, and performed at Carnegie Hall for three seasons with the New York Choral Society.

How have you changed or grown as a writer?

When I returned to writing fiction after so many years, I quickly learned how much I didn’t know. I pushed myself to learn everything I could learn, be teachable, and have a thick skin. Through social media, I went from an isolated and lonely writer to a writer with an abundance of fabulous friends. Writers’ conferences have become my support system of knowledge, networking, and friendships.

What is your favorite pastime?

I love mystery. My favorite way to chill is to read mystery/suspense novels or watch them on TV.

Do you have other books? We’d love to know.

I have contributed to several anthologies with Yvonne Lehman (Coolinary Moments, Christmas Moments, Stupid Moments, and Moments with Billy Graham) and will have a story in a new book, Horse of My Dreams, set to release from Revell on September 17, 2019.

What are you working on now?

I’m currently working on another novel set mostly in eastern Kentucky about Sparrow Massey. Sparrow believes she ended up in Appalachia by accident and spends her life trying to find her place in the world where she is loved and has worth. Her journey takes her through a series of natural disasters that force her to make hard decisions. Those choices result in even more disastrous situations, including assault, homelessness, and marrying a man who makes her a slave to his narcissistic desires.

 

Website: http://karenlynnnolan

Link to book: https://amzn.to/2voZUrR

You can contact Karen at http://karenlynnnolan.com.

 

Social media links:

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/JoyfulWritingAdventures/

Twitter: @KarenLynnNolan

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/karenlynnnolan/

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kathleen Maher on the Civil War

Kathleen L. Maher’s first crush was Peter Rabbit, and she’s loved conflicted heroes ever since. She has two novellas in Barbour Book collections: Victorian Christmas Brides and Lessons on Love. Winner ACFW Genesis Award. author of Sons of the Shenandoah Series: The Abolitionist’s Daughter and The Chaplain’s Daughter. Kathleen and her husband live in an old farmhouse in upstate NY with their children and a small zoo.

 

Tell us about your newest book.

The Chaplain’s Daughter is Book two in Sons of the Shenandoah, a Civil War romance. A feisty army laundress takes up her father’s calling when a proud artillery captain finds his heart and hope shattered. A minister’s daughter abandoned during war relies on faith and grueling labor to survive. A wounded widower feels God has forsaken him. Will her devout care bring medicine to his soul or rub salt in his wounds?

Why do you write? What drives you?

A desire to share the redemptive work of God in lives is a driving force—to share the hope found in a living relationship with Jesus Christ through faith. Even though my stories are fictional, the events are often based on true experiences, whether mine or those in history, or family members. I strive for authenticity in plots and conflicts and in resolutions and happily ever after endings. Sometimes God works through “coincidences.” And often, the worst possible catastrophes lead to those outcomes that scripture describes as “exceedingly abundantly above all we could ask or imagine.”

Who is your main character, and how did you choose that name?

The hero’s name is Gideon, because the biblical judge by the same name has a similar growth arc. The Bible hero begins as a broken man, hiding his harvest from the Midianites, entrenched in a generational cycle of defeat. An angel of the Lord appears to Gideon and says, “rise up mighty man of valour.” Gideon is reluctant to assume this identity, but after testing God with fleece, he finally finds the confidence to move forward as the leader he was born to be. The story’s hero Gideon Sharpe has experienced a series of devastating losses, and like his namesake, must rediscover his true identity hidden in Christ.

What is the hardest part of being an author?

Time management and marketing. Marketing consumes time just to learn the latest trends. Knowing what is working versus what is a waste of time and money means the difference between breaking even or possibly even losing money on a book launch. I am a traditionally and indie hybrid author, so some books require the additional expense of book covers, editing, plus marketing materials such as book marks, giveaways/blog prizes, featured deals, Amazon and Facebook ads. Writing can be an expensive and consuming endeavor.

What’s the best part of your author’s life? Why?

The joy of reader feedback, hearing when one’s stories touch hearts, is the best payment a writer could ask for. Interacting with the wonderful people in the writing community, both readers and fellow writers, has been the highlight of this journey.

What is your favorite pastime?

Spending time with my family, my husband/soulmate, my grandkids, and gardening, raising Newfoundland Puppies, painting wildlife and pet portraits, learning our country’s fascinating history, and walking with the Lord.

Do you have other books? We’d love to know.

Yes! Thank you for asking.The Abolitionist’s Daughter is Book 1 in the Sons of the Shenandoah series. This historical romance features twin brothers, Ethan and Devon Sharpe, who fight on opposite sides of the Civil War, after the crusading daughter of a Washington politician drives a spiritual wedge between them.

I also have two novellas in Barbour collections: The Victorian Christmas Brides Collectionwhich came out last Christmas, and Lessons on Lovewhich will launch October 2019. A Civil War romance novella which will re-release as a single title soon as well, titled Bachelor Buttons.

What are you working on now?

Book 3 in the Sons of the Shenandoah Series, No Man’s Daughter.Two years after Lee surrenders, Ben Sharpe, the youngest brother, tries to claim land abandoned by his deceased neighbors. A young lady resides there, and she claims the property belongs to her. Sparks fly in Rockingham County, Virginia, where between two rival interests, the war is still on!

I would love to offer one lucky commenter winner’s choice of one of my ebooks: either The Abolitionist’s Daughter, or The Chaplain’s Daughter. To enter, please share the link to this interview on social media, and leave a comment saying where you shared. (Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, etc) One entry per share. Be creative! 😉

Link to book:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07PPQ7H22/ref=dbs_a_def_rwt_bibl_vppi_i1

Social media links:
Amazon: amazon.com/author/kathleenlmaher

Facebook author page: https://www.facebook.com/KLMaherAuthor/

Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/kathleenlmaher/boards/

Goodreads: https://www.goodreads.com/user/show/2531698-kathleen-l

BookBub: https://www.bookbub.com/profile/kathleen-l-maher